5 Ways To Create A Truly Memorable CV

It’s a tough job market out there, and you need to make yourself stand out from the possibly hundreds of other applicants vying for your dream role. As someone over 50, you’ll have a lot of experience you can bring to a role. However, it can be difficult finding work if you’re coming back from a break, or if you’re embarking on a second career. Here’s 5 ways you can create a CV that will make an employer pick up the phone and bring you in for an interview.

  1. Customise your CV

Some people may advise you to rewrite your resume every time you apply for a job, but writing from scratch is time consuming and somewhat unnecessary. After all, information such as your contact details and education won’t change, job to job. Go through the job description and add in the skills that they’re looking for. Pick out the experience you have that makes you the perfect pick for the role, and make sure you include it.

  1. Do the hirer’s job for them

A hirer is going to be sifting through piles and piles of resumes, so if you make their job easier they’re much more likely to pick yours out. Use clear formatting, using bullet points to draw attention to vital information about you. Pick a clean typeface to make it easier to read, and use subtitles to allow the reader to quickly find the information they want.

  1. Use online services

If you’re applying for multiple roles at once, it can be difficult to keep up with the editing and rewriting process. With resumes, though, it’s vital that they’re grammatically clean, to keep you in the running for that job. These tools can help:

  • Resume Service:This site is a one stop shop for resume building and job hunting. Their builder tools help you put the CV together, and then you can upload it for hirers to find and get in contact with you.
  • Easy Word Counter: Check for spelling errors with this quick tool.
  • BoomEssays: If your proofreading skills are rusty, the writers at this site can help. Send them your resume, and they can proofread and edit it carefully to make sure it’s the best possible CV for you. This service is suggested by The Huffington Post at ‘Write My Essay’.
  • Ie vs Eg: This writing blog has lots of helpful grammar advice.
  • EssayRoo: This custom writing service can help you write a CV from scratch, which can be very useful if you haven’t had to build one in a long time, or are re-entering the job market. Their experienced writers will take your work history and arrange a resume that you know will be picked out for interview.
  • Cite It In: Cite your sources correctly with this tool.
  • UKWritings: This tool will help you improve your grammar.
  • State Of Writing: Use the writing guides here to help you improve your resume.
  1. Use the advert to your advantage

Hirers want to know that you’ve read their advert carefully, as they’ll then know that you’ll give tasks the close attention they need. Use language and phrases from the advert in your CV, to show that you’ve read it through. For example, if an advert calls for someone who can work with the public, mention in your job history that a role had you working in a public facing role.

  1. Talk about your achievements

A hirer needs to know if your experience can help you do the role you’re applying for now. Try talking about your achievements in recent roles that are relevant to the job. For example, you could use the successful social media campaigns you created as an example of your success in marketing.

Bonus Tip: Read your CV out loud

Resume editor Paula Morrison, from Assignment Help, says, “When you read your resume out loud, you’ll find you hit the same stumbling blocks that a recruiter would. You can then mark those issues for correction, making your resume much easier to read.”

Now you have the tools at hand, go ahead and make yourself a resume that really showcases your best assets. Soon, you’ll find yourself in your dream job, thanks to some skilful writing.

 

Mary Walton is a tutor at Academized, academic writing service. She also has a blog, SimpleGrad, where she writes about current state of education and shares online edtech tips. Mary helps with various businesses, like Revieweal, with content management.