23 March 2012 by Dinah Hall

Upcycled furniture: top five sites to buy from

It's the aesthete’s version of recycling: renewing used items and adding a fresh design twist. Dinah Hall selects the five best web sites for 're-loved' furniture and more
Upcycling_Neon Forest_IMG_7759a Courtesy Revived Furniture

From Revived Furniture’s Neon Forest collection. Photo from Revived Furniture

Upcycling means taking something old and tired (we’re talking objects here, not people) and giving it a new purpose in life. At its most basic it is just a paint job; blackboard paint covers a multitude of sins in the brown furniture world. But the best practitioners are more akin to artists, who take different elements of discarded furniture and reincarnate them in new forms.

Styling and Salvage Rupert Blanchard is one of the stars of the creative salvage world. Particularly lovely are his furniture pieces made from Victorian pine floorboards and old packing crates complete with original lettering. Visit Styling and Salvage.

Thomas Wold Wold is a skilled craftsman and the American grand master of upcycling. As well as high-end interiors, he creates playful but meticulous mash-ups of furniture with equally creative names like Fractured Fairy Fales and Primp Station. Visit Thomas Wold.

In the Woodshed was set up by two London émigrés  to the West Country, and stocks a rich mix of reworked lamps and industrial furniture, as well as a great range of vintage signage and letters. Visit In the Woodshed.

Zoe Murphy Zoe takes ‘unloved’ furniture – mostly mid-century in style – and makes it delectable and desirable. Chests of drawers are restored and printed with seaside imagery and lined with Fifties formica-inspired patterns. Visit Zoe Murphy.

Revived Furniture From pre-loved to re-loved: wooden chairs and chests are given a slick new look inspired by paint charts. They will make bespoke commissions using your old pieces or source furniture to match your requirements. Visit Revived Furniture.

For more than 30 years, Dinah has written about interiors, with the result that everything she once hated is now cool and fabulous. She now works freelance, mainly for the Sunday Telegraph and House & Garden. Dinah also reviews children’s books for the Sunday Telegraph and writes a blog with her daughter called Ladybookbird
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